With winter wedding planning, you have a few great things going for you. Venues are often less expensive in the winter than they are in the summertime. Because winter weddings are less popular, you’re less likely to run into problems finding a venue for the date you want, which can be a bonus if your friends have taken all the available summer dates for their weddings!

Wedding Favors for Guests
For a winter wedding, you’ll need to keep the weather in mind. Check with your venue or church ahead of time to make sure the building will have had time to warm up before your ceremony or reception. There’s nothing worse than your guests not being able to concentrate because they’re freezing cold! If you expect there to be a chill, set out a few blankets for your guests to cozy up in.

sherricassaradesigns.com

With winter wedding planning, you have a few great things going for you. Venues are often less expensive in the winter than they are in the summertime. Because winter weddings are less popular, you’re less likely to run into problems finding a venue for the date you want, which can be a bonus if your friends have taken all the available summer dates for their weddings!

A Warm Scarf for Bride
Even if you are wearing the wedding gown, you would better keep yourself warm and prepared a warm scarf around your shoulder. Actually, a warm scarf can give a chic winter wedding look. Have a try.

Via: wedding chicks

Via: Jacquelynn Photo

Short bridesmaid dresses are so trendy that lots of brides would like to dress up their girls with short dress. We have prepared 5 trendy short bridesmaid dresses for you and hope you can get inspired from these chic dresses.

Short Strapless Bridesmaid Dress with Belt
At once chic and effortless, this strapless bridesmaid dress features a satin trapunto-stitched belt and a short, silky skirt.

via: DAVID’S BRIDAL

Hey girls, we’d talked about three types of short dress for your summer look, did you love them? If you haven’t found your dreamy dress yet, today, we will share you a new style, which is the bohemian short dress. If you like it, you can click the photo and buy it:)!

Tulum Embroidered Mini
Slightly sheer mini dress featuring beautiful and colorful embroidery detailing, V-neckline, and three-quarter length wide sleeves. Pair this slightly sheer style with one of our Signature Seamless slips. Hidden side zip closure.

Short bridesmaid dresses are so trendy that lots of brides would like to dress up their girls with short dress. We have prepared 5 trendy short bridesmaid dresses for you and hope you can get inspired from these chic dresses. Today’s blog is going to introduce the third beautiful dress which is the winter short dress with scarf.

Peter Pan Collar Dolly Dress in Chambray
When in doubt? Do denim—for appropriate events at least! This Peter Pan collar dolly dress is incredibly youthful in terms of silhouette and made all the more casual and cute by its denim fabric!

VIA: popsu.gr

SHOP THIS LOOK at CHIC WISH

Short bridesmaid dresses are so trendy that lots of brides would like to dress up their girls with short dress. We have prepared 5 trendy short bridesmaid dresses for you and hope you can get inspired from these chic dresses. Today’s blog is going to introduce the second beautiful dress which is the elegant short grey dress.

Elegant Lace Illusion Neck Short Pleated A-Line Gray Chiffon Bridesmaid Dress
You will fall head over heels for this elegant lace illusion neck short pleated a-line gray chiffon bridesmaid dress. It features floral lace bodice with sweetheart cut underlay and high illusion neckline, illusion back with slit down center, chiffon sash at waist and flaring knee length multi-layered chiffon a-line skirt. Pictured in gray, blush pink, more than 30 colors are available for this bridesmaid dress.

 

Short bridesmaid dresses are so trendy that lots of brides would like to dress up their girls with short dress. We have prepared 5 trendy short bridesmaid dresses for you and hope you can get inspired from these chic dresses.

Vintage Chiffon Dress in Blush
This delicate chiffon dress has a great flowy cut that is classic and timeless. The Soft and Sweet Chiffon Dress is perfect for any spring or summer party. Pair it with beige wedges for a cute look.

It’s Grace Kelly’s fault. I don’t know if it’s an actual syndrome, but whenever I see a picture of her, within hours I find myself in the vicinity of a silk scarf counter. It’s almost Pavlovian. Make that Chekhovian. There’s rarely a happy ending to my silk-scarf encounters.

Cashmere and wool scarves I can do. Blankets? Bring them on. I’ve acquired excellent draping skills. But the dressier version I’ve never mastered. You know how, long ago, you assumed you had to feel mature before you had children? That’s how it is for me with silk scarves.
I’ve tried the Demi Moore-in-happier-times bandana approach, the Hugh Jackman neckerchief, the Marilyn Monroe headscarf and the leave-it-dangling-either-side-of-the- neck-and-hope-for-the-best-look. It’s no go. Most of these attempts never get as far as the front door. The few that did made me feel like Terry-Thomas.
In the end, I took pity on the biggest and most beautiful designs and framed them. There’s a wall in my house that looks terrific in scarves. But not me.
I don’t think I’m alone. Scarves are the recession-busters of the fashion world. Since Liberty devoted a whole department to them in its revamp two years ago, sales have risen 12 per cent. Harrods has also expanded its range. A resurgence of interest in print must have helped – many of London’s most creative, least traditional designers now produce silk scarves, as do the high street chains. And they’re especially popular at Christmas. Selfridges reports sales up 200 per cent this month.
You rarely see anyone wearing them though, do you? That may be about to change because last week I visited Hermès pop-up scarf shop in Harrods. I’ve always been sceptical about pop-up anything – but this was scarves. By Hermès. And there only until January 3. Obviously, a visit was required.

The main selling points, apart from the gazillion patterns and the Grace Kelly link, were Jade and Stuart, two stylish British art-school grads employed by Hermès to think up 500 (plus) things to do with a scarf. These include turning it into a chunky necklace by tying three strategically placed knots in a smallish square, turning it into a bracelet (tying knots into a tiny one), wearing a big one as a sarong, a halter neck top, or a dress, wrapping it around the handles of your bag or turning your lapdog into a lookey-likey Paris Hilton lapdog by giving it a cravat (apparently the Hermès Twilly, its smallest scarf, at £95, is all the rage in the canine world this season). But for me, the square de triomphe was the lovely, big, colourful squashy hob-style Hermès bag Jade made out of one of the largest scarves. Forget the usual three grand you kiss goodbye when investing in Hermès arm candy. This bag is yours for the price of a scarf.
Although the bag option requires the largest Hermès scarf (120cm x120cm), it turns out to be the simplest to execute. You take two diametrically opposite corners, tie them and pull up the ends; then do the same with the two remaining corners and…well, it’s tricky to explain, but try it and you’ll see how easy it is. Even I can do it.

Yes, I’m aware that the scarf I’m wearing looks a little bit like one of those dribble bibs that teething babies wear. Except mine is larger and made of silk. Why? Because we’ve reached an important moment in scarf semantics and it has fallen to me to tell you about it. You might be forgiven for thinking that we don’t need to be discussing scarves – it being the middle of the summer holidays and all – but for the best part of a decade we have been living in a world in which the summer scarf is a reality, not just a strange fashion industry construct.

Obviously I don’t mean woolly. I mean those printed cotton numbers that the world and his Wag are fond of. Kim Sears has one. You know the sort of thing. The genre began life about 12 years ago. It was a post-pashmina landscape and fashion was searching for an expensive accessory to promote that wasn’t a bag or shoe. Stephen Sprouse produced a leopard-print square scarf for Louis Vuitton that Kate Moss never seemed to take off. From there on it became the go-to airport security look for celebrities. It appeared in those “I can’t travel to Mustique without…” features in glossy magazines. Beyoncé protected Blue Ivy as a newborn with hers. Zara shifted loads of them. They are everywhere.

But as the sage Karl Lagerfeld says, “Trendy is the last stage before tacky.” And so fashion has turned its nose up at them and has come up with this – the big fashion bib – as the ahead-of-the-curve alternative.

Quick bib backstory: Céline premiered the neckerchief scarf on the catwalk a couple of seasons ago and Raf Simons at Dior has done it more recently. It is basically a square folded diagonally in half and knotted at the nape of the neck. By wearing your summer scarf like this you are semaphoring that you’ve read your catwalk notes.

Despite myself, I’m not entirely convinced by the silky bib. There seem to me to be two insurmountable negatives: not everyone will get it and it is embarrassingly efficient as a bib. As the vinaigrette spots will testify.

A simple but effective snood pattern for beginner knitters to celebrate National Knitting Week and Wool Week.

Pattern

Moss Stitch Snood by Rico Design

Difficulty

Easy

What you need

Yarn: 3 x 100g Rico Design Creative Twist Super Chunky in Light Grey (004)
Needles: 10mm (UK000 – USA 15)

Tension
8½ sts and 15 rows to 10cm, 4in over moss stitch pattern on 10mm needles

Abbreviations

cm centimetres
cont continue
in inch(es)
k knit
p purl
patt pattern
rep repeat
rs right side
st(s) stitch(es)
ws wrong side

Get started

Using 10mm needles and thumb method cast on 19 sts.

1st row (rs). * K1, p1, rep from * to last st, k1.

This row forms moss st patt.

Cont in patt until snood measures 141cm (55½in) ending with a ws row.

Cast off in patt.

To finish

Sew in ends. Join cast on and cast off edges using mattress stitch. Cover with a clean, damp tea towel and leave until dry. See the wool ball band for washing and further care instructions.